Friday, 14 October 2011

Aroids from Sabah (Sept 2011)

Some shots of aroids from Sabah; some of them are new species:


Homalomena sp.


Schismatoglottis sp.




Alocasia sp. (Either Alocasia puteri or A. pangeran)


Amorphophallus tinekeae:



Piptospatha kinabaluensis



Giant aroid, Alocasia robusta.


Piptospatha sp.


Amorphophallus tinekeae:



Alocasia robusta

Piptospatha sp.



Amorphophallus tinekeae:




New species of Alocasia.




Schismatoglottis sp.




2 comments:

  1. Wow, I am blown away! Those are some truly amazing finds! I can't believe how beautiful those plants are, especially that first Schismatoglottis, the coloration on the leaves is so unique! And same goes for that Piptospatha kinabaluensis which is just stunning. Not to mention the second Alocasia you found, I've never seen an Alocasia quite like that! The texture of the leaves is fascinating, and I love the size of it, (though for all I know it could be on its way to becoming a 6' monster lol). Can you give me some more details on what sort of soil requirements these Alocasias have please? Do they
    tend to stay near streams? Do they like acidic or more neutral soil? High humidity is an obvious requirement. Any tips on growing any of these plants would be greatly appreciated! Since I am proud to say that I have one or two specimens of each of the genera listed in this post! I need to read more about growing Alocasias before I'd attempt keeping some of the harder "Jewel Alocasias" and whatnot.

    But man, Alocasias aside, I certainly know how to grow Homalomena, Schismatoglottis, and Piptospatha species well, in fact I just had a Homalomena flower twice recently, followed by a Piptospatha, and I can't tell you how badly I would like to have some of these plants you pictured in my collection! As an Aroid collector, these pictures help me so much to understand the natural environments these plants grow in, but may I ask for some more technical details, such as roughly how fast does the water flow, and how deep does it get? I assume that both of those depend on the season, but more importantly, it would be useful to know the pH and hardness of the water. Judging by your pictures I'm going to venture a guess and say that the pH was probably slightly below neutral, and the water was of a moderate if not relatively higher kH/gH than some of the other environments you picture? Sorry for so many questions, I just love your blog and these plants so much, and the few specimens I do have, I cherish, and am trying to do everything I can to ensure their best health! Thanks for sharing these pictures with us! Oh, and what is that mess of green plants behind the second Alocasia? Just wondering since it is a bit hard to make out.

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  2. Alocasia usually grows on soil which got good drainage, on the slope or rocks.....but some species grow on swamp.

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